Rainier Yurts is now Rainier Outdoor. Ready for Adventure!
Crates and Shipping

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As your Rainier Yurt order nears completion on the production floor, our in-house crate department makes the custom crates that your investment will be packed in.

We crate every order, whether it is going to Gloucestershire, England or just down the road. The crates act like grocery carts while your yurt order is in production. Various components come from different shops within our 144,000 square foot facility. The fabric shop might finish days before the wood shop or metal shop, and the different components may be completed at different times even within the same shop. For example, the lattice may be finished a week before the door.contents

We use sophisticated ERP (Enterprise Resource Planning) software that allows us to organize the ordering and production of every yurt. Each order or job has a bar code number assigned to it and it is scanned to get the correct information regarding size, color, window location, etc. Nuts and bolts are automatically ordered, as are the roof material and doorknob. As these items come into the plant they are assigned to the specific yurt that they were ordered for. This type of lean manufacturing is more cost effective and creates less waste.

To prevent the inevitable “borrow from Paul to pay Peter,” we secure things that are assigned to a specific job. This assures that when you open your crate, everything that was checked off during the last Q.C. process is still in the crate. It is sort of like hermetically sealing a tomb; to prevent any outside interference and to ensure that all of the contents are exactly as they should be!

I have had people not want to take their order in the crates ... but from a practical point of view, it would take us a month of Sundays to load out a yurt piece by piece. This way we grab the crates with a forklift and load-out takes less than 15 minutes! I have heard horror stories about people who didn’t listen to our advice, and uncrated their yurt kits in our parking lot to fit their stuff in an undersized vehicle. Gouge marks on the beautiful rafters, ripped fabric, and in one case an uncrated dome blew off the top of the load on the freeway! Can you imagine a nearly 5’ clear acrylic half-bubble hitting your windshield? No thanks!

It is a much better idea to rent a 16’- 20’ Penske or Ryder box truck; depending on the size of the yurt and the rafter length (note: we do not recommend U-Haul due to the wheel-well placement) or come in a ½ or ¾ ton pickup with a 16’ or 20’ open utility trailer. Keep in mind that the truck cannot have construction racks, a canopy, or job-box in the back. The truck and trailer must have tie-down hooks to secure your load properly. You are responsible for bringing the rope, tie-downs, and ratchet straps. We will assist with loading your truck, but you have ultimate responsibility for properly securing your load.

Rainier Yurts can also ship the crates using a freight carrier to the final destination-often at a substantial discount because of our volume and relationships with several shipping companies. Once our craftsmen have completed your yurt, an outside freight broker will take over, contacting you to arrange for the delivery. At this time, you will be asked to provide the freight broker with details about this delivery and to set up payment options. From this point onward, all shipping, delivery and payments for the shipping will be between you and the freight broker. If you would like to arrange for your own shipping, here are the average size crates:

12’ or 14’ Sparrow Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 3’ h @ 1200 lbs

16’ Yurt:

2 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1800 lbs

18’ Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1800 lbs
1 - Dome Crate at 5’ x 5’ x 16” @ 210 lbs

21’ Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1550 lbs
1 - Dome Crate at 6’ x 6’ x 17” @ 260 lbs

24’ Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1550 lbs
1 - Dome Crate at 6’ x 6’ x 17” @ 260 lbs
1 - Rafter Crate at 2’ x 2’ x 12’-3” L @ 1500 lbs

27’ Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1550 lbs
1 - Dome Crate at 6’ x 6’ x 17” @ 300 lbs
1 - Rafter Crate at 2’ x 30" x 13’-4” L @ 1700 lbs

30’ Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1550 lbs
1 - Dome Crate at 6’ x 6’ x 17” @ 300 lbs
1 - Rafter Crate at 2’ x 3’ x 15’-6” L @ 1800 lbs

33’ Yurt:

1 - Main Crate at 4’ x 9’ x 6’ h @ 1550 lbs
1 - Dome Crate at 6’ x 6’ x 17” @ 300 lbs
1 - Rafter Crate at 3’ x 3’ x 17’-3” L @ 2000 lbs
1 - 60” French Door Crate @ 18” w x 92” t x 96” L @ 900 lbs (must ride upright)
1 - 48” French Door Crate @ 18” w x 80” t x 88” L @ 600 lbs (must ride upright)

Obviously, if you have added a 48” French door to a 21’ diameter yurt, you will add the last crate listed to the two required for that size order. You are probably thinking, “WOW! I had no idea the crates were this big!” And then the next thought pops into your head, “what the heck am I going to do with those crates after the yurt is up?”

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Yes, I am asked that a lot.

For starters, you should use the crate as a work bench while erecting the yurt. Keep your plans there under a large rock as a paperweight. I have heard of several instances where essential bolts and washers got accidentally kicked off the platform, which is understandable because the majority of the time you are working above your head and always looking up. You can take the “lid” off the main crate and create a workbench to keep all of your parts organized.

The main crate could be used for dry storage for firewood, garden tools, bicycles, solar batteries, chainsaw, hydroponic equipment, skis, snow shoes, life jackets, spare tires, cleaning supplies, buckets, tools, and lawn furniture. By putting a couple of hinges and a hasp lock on the end of the crate, you have a walk-in storage unit.

The rafter crate could be used as a cover for your kayak, surf board, Thule car roof rack, skis, herb garden, or compost bin. The dome crate would make a spiffy dining room table or platform to stand on while opening a soft plastic yurt window that is too far off the grade (remember the soft windows roll up from the outside!) We encourage you to re-purpose, reuse, recycle, and recreate new ways to put your yurt crates to use long after the yurt is up.

Here are a couple of examples:

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Send me your pictures – I’d love to share them on Facebook!

Enjoy the journey!

Dana Of Rainier, the Yurt Girl

Namaste~Dana, The Yurt Girl

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